OSHA

  • OSHA Updates Injury and Illness Reporting Requirements

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    OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) has updated employer responsibilities regarding the reporting of injuries and illnesses with the goal of preventing future injuries. Effective Jan. 1, 2015 (for employers in states covered by federal OSHA), employers must inform OSHA when an employee is killed on the job, or suffers a work-related hospitalization, amputation or loss of an eye. The new rule includes two core updates. OSHA is updating Read More

  • Safety News You Can Use

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    Many companies have been cited by OSHA for having unsafe working conditions and putting their workers at risk. Read more about the violations, as well as proposed changes to injury and illness reporting. Contractor Cited for Several Safety Hazards A construction company was cited by OSHA for 12 safety violations for placing worker in harm’s way for falls, burns and other workplace safety hazards during the installation of seawalls. According Read More

  • Noise Hazards in the Workplace: How to Quiet the Risk

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    Is your workplace harming the hearing of your workers? According to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), four million workers spend each workday in “damaging noise” and that 22 million are exposed to that damaging noise every year. NIOSH suggests that workers are not exposed to noise levels greater than 85 decibels (dBa) for eight hours. To prevent exposing workers to dangerous noise Read More

  • Shift Work: Keep Workers Safe Whenever They’re on the Job

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  • Young Worker Safety: Tips to Prevent Injuries and Accidents

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    Two young workers suffocated in a grain silo. A young worker was killed after being caught in a mortar mixer. A young pool manager was electrocuted. These are all real-life examples of young worker accidents OSHA (Occupational Health & Safety Administration) features on its website about young worker safety. According to OSHA, 361 young workers were killed in 2012. You may currently have young workers on your payroll, Read More

  • Forklift Safety: Proper Training Can Save Lives

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    Proper training can be a lifesaver. That’s certainly true when it comes to forklift operation training. According to OSHA (Occupational Safety & Health Administration), forklift accidents cause approximately 85 fatalities and 34,900 serious injuries annually. OSHA estimates that about 20 to 25 percent of those are caused in part by inadequate training. OSHA states that forklift operators must be trained and certified by their companies, which are required Read More

  • Product Spotlight: Hard Hats

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    Hard hats and other head protection are the best defense against head injuries on the job. OSHA (Occupational Safety & Health Administration) notes that protective helmets or hard hats should: Resist penetration by objects Absorb the shock of a blow Be water-resistant and slow burning Have clear instructions explaining proper adjustment and replacement of the suspension and headband But hard hats do not provide adequate protection if they don’t fit. There should be Read More

  • Protect Your Head: Protective Headgear Saves Lives

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    Since head injuries can be life-altering or even fatal, it’s important to wear the proper head protection on the jobsite. Hard hats can protect both workers and supervisors from falling objects, bumping their heads on objects, as well as helping them to avoid contact with electrical hazards. Protective headgear, such as hard hats, has to meet ANSI standards or provide equal protection. Employers must select the type of Read More

  • Safety News You Can Use

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    Several companies were recently fined for a variety of OSHA (Occupational Safety & Health Administration) violations. Retailer Cited for Multiple Safety Violations A national retailer faces penalties of $217,000 after being cited for four safety violations (three willful and one repeat) in a Montana location. The willful violations were failure to keep exit routes free and unobstructed, storing materials in unstable and unsecured ways, and using space around electrical Read More

  • Safety in Small Spaces: Preventing Confined Space Danger

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    Confined spaces can be extremely dangerous work areas because of their size. OSHA (Occupational Safety & Health Administration) defines a confined space as an area with “limited openings for entry or exit, is large enough for entering and working, and not designed for continuous worker occupancy.” Examples of confined spaces, according to OSHA, are underground vaults, tanks, storage bins, manholes, pits and silos. Permit-required confined spaces include those Read More

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