These digital resources are also available for Pipe Markers and Valve Tags:

 

Pipe Markers and Valve Tags

Click here to download Seton’s Full Pipe Marking Guidelines

Several Laws and Regulations exist regarding Pipe Markers and Valve Tags. Most prominent of them are the Occupational Safety and Health Act or OSHA Act of 1970, and the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977. Click here to shop for Pipe Markers and Valve Tags.

OSHA 2015

Complete 2015 OSHA

OSHA Booklet

All About OSHA Booklet
(ENG / SPA)

Workers' Rights Booklet

Workers’ Rights Booklet
(ENG / SPA)

New Reporting Requirements

New Reporting Requirements
(ENG / SPA)

OSHA Law Poster

OSHA: It’s the Law Poster
(ENG / SPA)

General Industry Digest

General Industry Digest

 

 

ANSI/ASME A13.1 is the pipe identification standard most commonly used in the United States. The standard specifies the primary and secondary means of identifying pipe contents, as well as the size, color and placement of the identification device.

PRIMARY PIPE IDENTIFICATION

The text legend (name of pipe content) and directional arrow remain the primary means of identifying pipe contents. Attaching arrows at one or both ends of the marker indicates flow direction. See the ANSI/ASME size chart and installation guide in the following sections for more details.

SECONDARY PIPE IDENTIFICATION

A secondary means of pipe marker identification is the color code of the marker. The terminology of inherently hazardous or nonhazardous has been removed from the standard, effective since 2007.

Other significant color changes in 2007 included the addition of Brown/White for combustible fluids and Orange/Black for toxic or corrosive fluids.  The standard also identified four additional “defined by user” color combinations for additional customization options on non-standard markers. Those exact colors are the recommended safety colors contained in the ANSI Z535.1 standard.

The updates to ANSI/ASME A13.1-2015 added oxidizing fluids to the definitions for Yellow/Black, but did not add any new colors to the standard.

 

ANSI/ASME A13.1-2015 Colors:

ANSI/ASME A13.1-1996 Colors:

SETON PIPE MARKING SYSTEMS MEET THE ANSI/ASME A13.1 STANDARD

According to the standard, pipe markers should be positioned so that they are readily visible to plant personnel from the point of normal approach. Seton pipe markers instantly tell you all you need to know about pipe contents, direction of flow and whether they’re hazardous or safe.

HOW TO PROPERLY LABEL PIPES

  1. Obtain a legend list of all pipe contents in your plant.
  2. Collect the following data on your piping systems (this may require tracing lines to determine quantities and sizes):

– Pipe contents

– Outside diameter of pipe (including insulation)

– Quantity of markers needed per ASME/ANSI A13.1 or other standards

– Pressure

– Temperature

– To/From information

– Location of specific legends by area (for aid in installation)

***Note: You may be able to use blueprints or P&IDs if they are current instead of walking down all of your lines. Seton also offers Take-Off Services to help you determine your pipe marking needs.

  1. Select color of marker.

OSHA Standard 1910

• Part Number: 1910
• Part Title: Occupational Safety and Health Standards
• Subpart: B
• Subpart Title: Adoption and Extension of Established Federal Standards
• Standard Number: 1910.12
• Title: Construction work.
• GPO Source: e-CFR

1926.16(a)

The prime contractor and any subcontractors may make their own arrangements with respect to obligations which might be more appropriately treated on a jobsite basis rather than individually. Thus, for example, the prime contractor and his subcontractors may wish to make an express agreement that the prime contractor or one of the subcontractors will provide all required first-aid or toilet facilities, thus relieving the subcontractors from the actual, but not any legal, responsibility (or, as the case may be, relieving the other subcontractors from this responsibility). In no case shall the prime contractor be relieved of overall responsibility for compliance with the requirements of this part for all work to be performed under the contract.

1926.16(b)

By contracting for full performance of a contract subject to section 107 of the Act, the prime contractor assumes all obligations prescribed as employer obligations under the standards contained in this part, whether or not he subcontracts any part of the work.

1926.16(c)

To the extent that a subcontractor of any tier agrees to perform any part of the contract, he also assumes responsibility for complying with the standards in this part with respect to that part. Thus, the prime contractor assumes the entire responsibility under the contract and the subcontractor assumes responsibility with respect to his portion of the work. With respect to subcontracted work, the prime contractor and any subcontractor or subcontractors shall be deemed to have joint responsibility.

1926.16(d)

Where joint responsibility exists, both the prime contractor and his subcontractor or subcontractors, regardless of tier, shall be considered subject to the enforcement provisions of the Act.

SEC. 17. Penalties
(a) Any employer who willfully or repeatedly violates the requirements of section 5 of this Act, any standard, rule, or order promulgated pursuant to section 6 of this Act, or regulations prescribed pursuant to this Act, may be assessed a civil penalty of not more than $70,000 for each violation, but not less than $5,000 for each willful violation.

(b) Any employer who has received a citation for a serious violation of the requirements of section 5 of this Act, of any standard, rule, or order promulgated pursuant to section 6 of this Act, or of any regulations prescribed pursuant to this Act, shall be assessed a civil penalty of up to $7,000 for each such violation.

(c) Any employer who has received a citation for a violation of the requirements of section 5 of this Act, of any standard, rule, or order promulgated pursuant to section 6 of this Act, or of regulations prescribed pursuant to this Act, and such violation is specifically determined not to be of a serious nature, may be assessed a civil penalty of up to $7,000 for each violation.

(d) Any employer who fails to correct a violation for which a citation has been issued under section 9(a) within the period permitted for its correction (which period shall not begin to run until the date of the final order of the Commission in the case of any review proceeding under section 10 initiated by the employer in good faith and not solely for delay or avoidance of penalties), may be assessed a civil penalty of not more than $7,000 for each day during which such failure or violation continues.

(e) Any employer who willfully violates any standard, rule, or order promulgated pursuant to section 6 of this Act, or of any regulations prescribed pursuant to this Act, and that violation caused death to any employee, shall, upon conviction, be punished by a fine of not more than $10,000 or by imprisonment for not more than six months, or by both; except that if the conviction is for a violation committed after a first conviction of such person, punishment shall be by a fine of not more than $20,000 or by imprisonment for not more than one year, or by both.

(f) Any person who gives advance notice of any inspection to be conducted under this Act, without authority from the Secretary or his designees, shall, upon conviction, be punished by a fine of not more than $1,000 or by imprisonment for not more than six months, or by both.

(g) Whoever knowingly makes any false statement, representation, or certification in any application, record, report, plan, or other document filed or required to be maintained pursuant to this Act shall, upon conviction, be punished by a fine of not more than $10,000, or by imprisonment for not more than six months, or by both.

(h) (1) Section 1114 of title 18, United States Code, is hereby amended by striking out “designated by the Secretary of Health and Human Services to conduct investigations, or inspections under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act” and inserting in lieu thereof “or of the Department of Labor assigned to perform investigative, inspection, or law enforcement functions”.

(2) Notwithstanding the provisions of sections 1111 and 1114 of title 18, United States Code, whoever, in violation of the provisions of section 1114 of such title, kills a person while engaged in or on account of the performance of investigative, inspection, or law enforcement functions added to such section 1114 by paragraph (1) of this subsection, and who would otherwise be subject to the penalty provisions of such section 1111, shall be punished by imprisonment for any term of years or for life.

(i) Any employer who violates any of the posting requirements, as prescribed under the provisions of this Act, shall be assessed a civil penalty of up to $7,000 for each violation.

(j) The Commission shall have authority to assess all civil penalties provided in this section, giving due consideration to the appropriateness of the penalty with respect to the size of the business of the employer being charged, the gravity of the violation, the good faith of the employer, and the history of previous violations.

(k) For purposes of this section, a serious violation shall be deemed to exist in a place of employment if there is a substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a condition which exists, or from one or more practices, means, methods, operations, or processes which have been adopted or are in use, in such place of employment unless the employer did not, and could not with the exercise of reasonable diligence, know of the presence of the violation.

(l) Civil penalties owed under this Act shall be paid to the Secretary for deposit into the Treasury of the United States and shall accrue to the United States and may be recovered in a civil action in the name of the United States brought in the United States district court for the district where the violation is alleged to have occurred or where the employer has its principal office.

 

Shop Seton’s Pipe Markers and Valve Tags Now!

 

To Learn More About Seton’s Pipe Markers and Valve Tags:

Seton has additional resources to help you select the right pipe markers and valve tags for your projects.

Pipe Markers and Valve Tags Home
Laws, Regulations & Standards
Product Specifications
Pipe and Valve Submittals
Pipe Marker Buying Guide
How To Videos
Contractor Services